THEMES

ARTISTS & SPECIAL GUESTS

Farwiza Farhan

Yayasan HAkA

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 10:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 11:30 – 12:00

Biography

Farwiza is a forest conservationist based in Sumatra and the founder of Yayasan HAkA (Forest, Environment, Aceh Foundation). The goal of the organisation is to accelerate protection, conservation and restoration of the Leuser Ecosystem through empowering communities to have active and meaningful participation in policy processes. The Leuser Ecosystem is the last place on earth where rhino, tiger, elephant, and orangutan still co-exist in the wild.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

George Nuku

(Maori – New Zealand)

Maori Artist

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 13:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 12:30 – 13:30
  • 13:45 – 16:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:45 – 16:00

George Nuku

George Nuku is an artist of Maori, Scot and German descent from Aotearoa / New Zealand. His career as an artist spans over 3 decades. His works range from small amulets carved from bone, shell, plastic, and stone through to life-size works in plexiglass, stone, wood, and polystyrene. Ultimately culminating in monumental sculptures of multistory height.

He carries thousands of years of artistic tradition, handed down from his forebears that promises to expand life and enhance survival. His works are collected by the rich and poor alike. For the past 7 years, his ‘Bottled Ocean’ installations have been touring the world in the northern, southern, eastern, and western hemisphere. He is 55 years old and has 5 sons ranging in age from 26 to 3 years old.

Remember the future

Talk Summary

I bring my message of a life’s work and commitment towards the remembrance of interconnection/inter-relation / inter-dependence.

Indigenous Related Topics

My talk addresses both autochtonne and occidental reality -it is unsustainable to only address the indigenous reality – both realities are connected to each other.

Plorentina Dessy Elma Thyana

(Dayak – Indonesia)

SAKOLAH ADAT

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 12:00 – 12:30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Plorentina Dessy Elma Thyana is a proud Dayak Simpang descendant from Kalimantan. Born in 1996 in Balai Semandang village, her love for the village kids and indigenous knowledge drive her to establish an informal educational movement to connect the children to their elders. In 2014, she started the class to teach about traditional medicine, stories, music and dance, traditional games, traditional food, ways of life, philosophy and cultural values, and rituals performance. Not to forget the basic human survival to read and write. 3 years later, the movement is legalized under the name SAKOLAH ADAT ARUS KUALAN together with her colleague Modesta Wisa which also run the movement in the other part of West Kalimantan. On the other hands, Dessy is a Dayak traditional dancer, singer, and musicion.

About Sakolah Adat

Create a forum to connect traditional leaders and young people to continue traditional knowledge that has become the way of life of Indigenous peoples. Creating independent, creative and intelligent indigenous children in the modern era while still carrying and maintaining their identity as Indigenous people. Make young people proud of customs and culture.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Small Island Big Song

Small Island Big Song

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • EVENING PERFORMANCE
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

BaoBao Chen

Fluent in both Mandarin and English, Taiwanese project producer and manager BaoBao Chen has a Bachelor of Business Administration degree and a profile as a public speaker, including a TEDx Talk, and a social media following of 150k. Along with her partner Tim Cole, the two launched the “Small Island Big Song” project in 2015, and have been independently recording and filming with over a hundred musicians across the islands of Pacific and Indian Oceans since. The album “Small Island Big Song” was released in July 2018. As the project manager, BaoBao has also brought the project’s live show, featuring 4 to 12 musicians across the oceans, to stage, booking and managing an extensive world tour in 2018 to 4 continents and engaged more than 100k live audiences. She also produced an interactive website showcasing the music, videos and stories of Small Island Big Song.

Tim Cole

Tim Cole is an Australian Filmmaker and Music Producer who has been specialising on cross cultural projects since producing ‘Not Drowning Wavings’’, landmark album & DVD ‘Tabaran’ in Papua New Guinea. He studied filmmaking at Melbourne University under Arthur Cantrill, subsequently perusing an interest in poetic and non-narrative filmmaking. As expressed in his 2014 directorial debut ‘Vanuatu Women’s Water Music’, ‘Visually stunning, as well as culturally important’, 5 stars, Songlines UK. The film was officially selected for six international film festivals, and was nominated for a UNESCO Cultural Award. As a music producer/engineer Tim Cole has been behind numerous successful and critically acclaimed albums and feature film soundtracks. Tim was officially invited to represent at the United Nations HQ, SXSW, WOMEX and the Peace Boat. He has also received a Churchill Fellowship and is a company member of Circus OZ.

About Small Island Big Song

It was exactly 4 years ago after the 4th IPCC report, we were motivated to do what we could, so as a music producer and a project producer, we began recording songs with indigenous musicians across the region, those have lived on the islands for the longest, those who sing for the seas. Over thousands of years, songs have played an vital role of storytelling and passing down knowledge through generations. True sustaining change is culturally driven, as artists we can shift societies narrative, we have a duty to. With support, we recorded and filmed with 33 featured musicians/groups across 16 island nations of the Pacific & Indian Oceans, where 400 million people share a little known common seafaring ancestry.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Zein Alitamara Mufthihati

(Indonesia)

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 11:30 – 12:30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Zein Alitamara Mufthihati is a Borneo-based poster artist, and independent graphic designer. Also working in the fields of illustration, painting and drawing, Zein was born in 1991 in Palangka Raya, Central Borneo. She graduated from Bina Nusantara University, Jakarta in Visual Communication Design in 2014. In 2018, Zein was selected in ORBIT 2018, an incubation program by Bekraf RI with other 15 designers. She was the founder of Studio Kurik in 2015 in Central Borneo and loves making poster on music and poem, culture related subjects. Studio kurik works on visual art projects, poster exhibitions, and workshops, while also experimenting autonomously between culture and aesthetic. Her posters have been exhibited in various exhibitions and contests around the world such as Lahti International Poster Triennial (Finland), Moscow Global Biennale of Graphic Design (Russia), MadridGraficá (Spain), Poster For Tomorrow (France), Mut Zur Wut (Germany).

Workshop Summary

Coming Soon

Yuvenalis Juntai

(Dayak – Indonesia)

Masyarakat Adat Dayak

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 9:15
  • 9:30 – 13:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 12:00 – 13:00
  • 13:45 – 16:00
  • 16:00

Biography

Yuvenalis Juntai is an expert in traditional medicine and also a ritual leader, and a traditional ceremony.

About Masyarakat Adat Dayak

Introducing and demonstrating that indigenous peoples have rich knowledge and are naturally gained from everyday life with nature. Inviting everyone to see the forces of nature in indigenous peoples who can motivate how to learn from indigenous people how to establish relationships with nature.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Serena Bara

Bush Medijina

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 13:00 – 15:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 10:30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 10:45 – 11:15
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

My name is Serena Bara, mother of 2 and I come from Angurugu Community on Groote Eylandt in the Gulf of Carpentaria situated 600km from Darwin. I am an Anindilyakwa/Nunggubuyu women but lived and grew up on Groote Eylandt. I was sent to boarding school for 4 yrs and upon returning to my community I landed myself a job as a receptionist with the Local Community Government Council and my journey began. Becoming the youngest council member on board I learned and challenged many obstacles, hurdling my way up throughout my career. I’ve also worked for Gebie (Groote Eylandt & Bickerton Island indigenous Enterprise) ALC (Anindilyakwa Land Council) prior to establishing ASAC (Anindilyakwa Services Aboriginal Corporation) then downsizing to Bush Medijina (current employee) I’ve sat on numerous boards representing my community and people as my passion is about helping my people. My current employment at Bush Medijina I love what I do, as a Chairwomen of the board I feel proud of the achievements we’ve achieved in such a short period of time and is privileged to be working with my board members for keeping our business sustained and these amazing Organization like IBA-Investible- South32- ALC (Anindilyakwa Land Council)- GEBIE (Groote Eylandt & Bickerton Island Enterprise) GEAT-(Groote Eylandt Aboriginal Trust) who are supporting us on our journey

About Bush Medijina

Most important to us is the wellbeing of Warningakalina women. As indigenous women, we face many challenges. With high rates of crime and violence in our communities we don’t always feel safe, impacting our mental health, and that of our children. School attendance rates are low; jobs are scarce. Our life expectancy is reduced due to systemic and genetic health issues, exacerbated by our remote location and limited access to services. The future of our people lies in building culture and capability across the archipelago. We wish to empower our women to become strong in both body and mind, better able to face these challenges and be leaders in, and advocates for, our own communities. The Bush Medijina shed is a safe place for us to meet and share our stories and culture. The program regularly initiates activities to educate Warningakalina women and their families on a range of health, wellbeing and community leadership topics. These activities also provide an opportunity to share and preserve cultural knowledge. We engage in a range of programs with local schools to ensure younger indigenous girls are learning to walk in two worlds; learning to successfully run a business, while paying respect to cultural traditions, and providing the opportunity to be on country with their aunties, mothers and grandmothers.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Raelene Mamarika

Bush Medijina

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 13:00 – 15:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 10:30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 10:45 – 11:15
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

My name is Raelene Mamarika. I live with my partner and son who is 7 years old. I live in a small town called Umbakumba, which is on Groote Eylandt, in the Gulf of Carpentaria, in the Northern Territory of Australia. There are about 400 people in my town – I’m related to nearly all of them. We have two shops, one in the centre of town and the other down near the beach. We have a small school, and this is where I went as a little girl and teenager. Umbakumba is a pretty spot that has a wonderful lagoon full of fish, crabs, stingray, shellfish and other animals – even crocodiles. Each workday I catch a bus at 630, and travel 40 km to a mine site called GEMCO. Here I work with other friends and family to collect seeds, grow bush tuckers, control weeds, learn new skills and support my community. I’m really excited and a little bit scared to be here in Bali, it is my first time out of Australia.

About Bush Medijina

Most important to us is the wellbeing of Warningakalina women. As indigenous women, we face many challenges. With high rates of crime and violence in our communities we don’t always feel safe, impacting our mental health, and that of our children. School attendance rates are low; jobs are scarce. Our life expectancy is reduced due to systemic and genetic health issues, exacerbated by our remote location and limited access to services. The future of our people lies in building culture and capability across the archipelago. We wish to empower our women to become strong in both body and mind, better able to face these challenges and be leaders in, and advocates for, our own communities. The Bush Medijina shed is a safe place for us to meet and share our stories and culture. The program regularly initiates activities to educate Warningakalina women and their families on a range of health, wellbeing and community leadership topics. These activities also provide an opportunity to share and preserve cultural knowledge. We engage in a range of programs with local schools to ensure younger indigenous girls are learning to walk in two worlds; learning to successfully run a business, while paying respect to cultural traditions, and providing the opportunity to be on country with their aunties, mothers and grandmothers.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Charles Mugarura

Braodfield Enterprises Uganda – Permaculture Group

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 10:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 10:30

Biography

Charles Mugarura , a 27 Permaculture social entrepreneur, Tutor , designer, and innovator with 12 years’ experience in permaculture eco –system design. Mugarura started permaculture at the age of 16, under the Blue Mountain Permaculture Institute of Australia with Rosemary Morrow and Dan Palmer with Permaculture Across Borders Project in 2018. It’s now Charles’ full-time career with a background in Computer Science – Makerere University Business School and a number of specialized expertise disciplines. A Global Citizen based in the horn of East Africa – Uganda, Charles serves at national and global level, a policy advocate on youth empowerment, Gender Equality, Health, and sustainable transformation through best and efficient alternatives from the environment as Charles believes in reframing Indigenous technologies using the permaculture approach. He has successfully implemented and committed his deep understanding and works to use permaculture to develop various solutions from farming practices, education, leadership and lifestyle using permaculture, with his dream to transform people, he founded a permaculture social enterprise in 2012, incorporated in 2016. Focused on the creation, implementation, and use of innovative climate change adaptation strategies using the permaculture ethics and principles, especially with the most vulnerable populations of rural farming communities, Charles believes in building practical and permaculture dynamic human resource.

About BEU

BEU’s focus is on creating, implementing and on use of innovative climate change adaptation strategies using the permaculture ethics and principles.

Permaculture and the People of Uganda – East Africa

Talk Summary

Permaculture in Uganda and to the rest of the region of East Africa, is a dynamic growing solution that is appealing to address needs of people, economy, education, environment with a clear pathway to resilient development of a humble lifestyle with concerns to limit consumption and regenerative production practices. Permaculture fundamental development is set to stand on efficient and skilled human resource of educators, demonstrators and innovators that are empowered to empower their circles in all forms at rural and urban levels in balancing dimensions of the literate to illiterate in the process of learning from each other. World Problems remain and accelerate if we don’t build a generation that is equipped to develop a solution that needs to create a transition to resource regeneration for the next fifty years. The Journey begins with micro Units of works by each of us in our zones, connecting them together to benefit one another in all forms of survival. The human race remains the main player in accelerating change the fact that nature is willing and already working around the clock to justify principles of succession and feedback. We redefine our future with Indigenous and efficient modern strategies that can harmonies our existence and the future. There is no future than the real moment of now or today, its the only opportunity at hand for you to make a commitment of justice on everything around you.

Indigenous Related Topics

To a large extend Connect – Respect – Protect Indigenous wisdom — remains very fundamental if we lose it, we disconnect our children and our life from the future of the ecosystem to become intruders. I passionately build towards creating and innovating within the Indigenous framework of efficiency.

Jani Bellefleur-Kaltush

Innu – Canada

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 13:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 10:30
  • 13:45 – 16:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 10:00 – 10:30
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Jani Bellefleur-Kaltush first worked with Wapikoni in 2009 when the traveling studio moved into her Innu community of Nutashkuan. She got involved as a coordinator and directed her film “Do not Say It”. It was presented in official competition at the Montreal International Documentary Encounters (RIDM), the Rendez-vous du cinéma québécois in Montreal and the Festival Regarding Short Film in Saguenay, was a great success. In 2011, she was production assistant on the film “Mesnak” by Yves Sioui-Durand, one of the first fiction films about natives in Quebec. This experience led to a production assistant position at the producer. In 2015, she studied film production at INIS before going to work in a hybrid movie theater in France. She also works as an Innu-French translator. In 2017, she participated in a group exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts entitled Kushapetshekan / Kosapitcikan. She counts France, Belgium, the Netherlands, England, the United States, Peru and Guatemala as the country she visited.

About Innu

The Innu or Montagnais, or Naskapi are an indigenous people from the east of the peninsula of Quebec-Labrador, specifically regions of the North Shore and Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean in Quebec and the region from Labrador to Newfoundland and Labrador1. The term “Innu” comes from their language, Innu-aimun, and means “to be human”. This name was officially adopted in 1990 replacing the term “Montagnais” given by the first French explorers. The Innu refer to their ancestral territory as Nitassinan. In 2016, their number was estimated at more than 22,000, more than 20,000 in Quebec in 11 bands and more than 2,000 in Labrador in two bands.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Craig Commanda

Anishinaabe – Canada

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 13:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 10:00 – 10:30
  • 11:30 – 12:30
  • 13:45 – 16:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Anishinaabe multidisciplinary artist from Kitigan Zibi, Craig Commanda works through the moving image, poetry, music and sound composition. A practice unfolding over a decade, his creative process has enabled community engagement and travel across Turtle Island and beyond. Craig has participated in many international artist residencies including (Re)Claim + Diverse is this Land at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, cultural exchange residencies in Aoteara – New Zealand as well as in Haïti in collaboration with Lojiq. His work has been screened in festivals including Asinabka (unceded Algonquin territory – Ottawa, Cnd), ImagiNATIVE (Toronto, Cnd), Kurzfiltage (Winterthur, Switzerland), Maoriland (Otaki, NZ), and Wairoa Maori film festival (Nuhqkq, NZ). Craig is a current student studying Film Production at Concordia and is an advocate for mental wellness and suicide prevention. His practice seeks resurgence contributing to cultural preservation and revitalization for and by Indigenous peoples. He is currently based in Tiohtiá:ke/ Montreal.

About Anishinaabe

The name of my language is Anishinaabemowin. We live in harmonious kinships with all of creation. We came from the land, and we use medicine plants to cure our ills and ceremonies like the sweat lodge, to talk to the Creator.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Emmanuela Shinta

Ranu Welum Foundation

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 11:30 – 12:30
  • 13:45 – 16:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 10:00
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Emmanuela Shinta is a Dayak leader, activist, filmmaker and writer with a reputation for leading and empowering young people. Her work has been recognized widely in Asia Pacific, including being the icon of Asian Geographic issue 117 Planet Under Fire and featured in UNICEF Global White Paper Women Health & Climate 2017. With organization called Ranu Welum Foundation which she founded in 2016, she has trained more than 100 young indigenous people to be able to use camera to tell their causes. She has been speaking on behalf of her communities in regional and international forum about public misconception on Dayak people and bringing the stories from the ground up to global audience through short videos and documentaries.

About Dayak Maanyan

Once upon a time, there was an ancient Kingdom called Nan Sarunai which means, The Most Famous One. Yes, it was famous for its golden treasures and land resources. People were prosperous and happy. The king and the people really loved to sing and dance. Every day musical instruments were played and people would dance and sing happily. One of the most famous instruments was the flute with seven holes called a Sarunai. With strong brotherhood and simplicity, the kingdom lasted for more than a thousand years before Majapahit attacked and destroyed the kingdom. The Dayak Maanyan is one of the oldest tribes whose built their own kingdom in very ancient times. Their history goes back a long way. While the Kutai Kingdom in East Kalimantan is noted as the oldest kingdom in the archipelago, research in 1996 carried out on the ruins of a temple found in South Kalimantan which once belonged to Nan Sarunai territory, shows that Nan Sarunai existed in 200 BC. It means that Nan Sarunai Kingdom is 600 years older than Kutai Kingdom, which was built in the 4th century. Dadas is the name for the female dance and Bawo for male dance. Both of the dancers wear at least three pairs of large bracelets on both wrists and dance beautifully following the rhythm, beat and music produced by traditional instruments.

YOUNG GENERATION – INDIGENOUS WISDOMS

Talk Summary

We believe indigenous wisdoms are the key to save the planet. Those are the wisdoms that have been keeping our forests for thousands hears. It cannpt be replaced by technology, yet technology can be very effective to suppor the restoration of the ecosystem and to enhance our responsibilities as human. This is where our generation has to play the role. Indigenous wisdoms combined with skills and knowledges that we obtain from education is a very powerful tool to make a change and create a better future.

Suporahardjo Fnu

Tanoker Ledokombo

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • EVENING PERFORMANCE
Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 12:30

Biography

Suporahardjo is a board member of Tanoker Foundation. Tanoker is a community known for promoting traditional children’s games “Egrang Bambu” stilt in Ledokombo District, Jember Regency, East Java. Graduated in Doctoral Degree of Sociology from the University of Indonesia, since 1990 Suporahardjo has often been involved in natural resource management and conflict management activities. Its activity can be seen from the many roles it plays, for example as researchers, consultants, training facilitators, and workshops in various types of social activities that it follows. Even since 2011 until now, Suporahardjo has also joined as a member of the Indonesian Forestry Ministry’s National Forestry Extension Commission. In 2008, He moved with his family from Jakarta to Ledokombo then with the children of Ledokombo they initiated community (Tanoker) which established in 2009.

About Tanoker Ledokombo

Our mission is reaffirming educative traditional games, developing collaborative parenting and also developing society as a participatory, creative, innovative and inspirational learning resource.

Metamorphosis on Bamboo Dancing

Workshop Summary

We will facilitate, share inspiration and experience about Egrang (stilts) game and dance. We believe that Egrang is not just a traditional game but also a tool for change for Ledokombo children and the community. Egrang is a symbol or medium – a social-changing tool. It is something traditional that has fallen into disuse, but now it is used to encourage children to move and change.

Miliwanga Wurrben

(Rembarrnga – Australia)

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 12:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 9.30 – 10.30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 16:00 – 16:30

Biography

Miliwanga Wurrben is a traditional Rembarrnga women from the Mirratja clan group, originally from the Central Arnhem region. Her skin group is Galijan of the Duwa moity. Miliwanga comes from a family line of traditional healers and is an advocate for sharing the importance of traditional Indigenous healing modalities and works as a Traditional Cultural Education Consultant. Miliwanga is a traditional artist, weaver, and healer. She has overcome adversity in her own life, and is a respected leader and Elder, and a recognised advocate for the rights of Indigenous People. Miliwanga works as a Cultural Advisor and language interpreter, facilitating Cultural Awareness workshops with medical students and health providers, educating on traditional bush medicine and traditional health therapies. Miliwanga co-facilitates weekly Yarning Circles and is Chair of Banatjarl Strongbala Women’s Association and a board member of Mimi Arts, Katherine, and uses her art work as a tool to share the wisdom of her ancient culture. Miliwanga travels widely, speaking on the importance of strong cultural identity, spiritual well-being and true reconciliation, and core cultural values. Miliwanga has facilitated workshops with Amnesty International and Oxfam on the United Nations Declarations of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Ulaach Tez Ulaachtiran

United Pax Tatarica

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:30 – 12:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 17:00 – 18:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:40 – 15:00

Biography

I’m an international Tatar/ Mongol nomad who travels by singing and healing people using ancient Mongolian sound vibrations. I gave lectures at Universities about Mongolian Shamanic knowledge, and healing through sound. I get by through generous donations from attendees, organizations and institutions. I also organize horse caravans in Mongolia every summer.

About United Pax Tatarica

To preserve indigenous Tatar Mongolian languages and Shamanic beliefs.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

SPEAKERS AND FACILITATORS

Kehkashan Basu

Green Hope Foundation

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 12:00

Biography

Iconic youth leader , global influencer , environmentalist, champion of children’s rights , peace and sustainability campaigner and a passionate advocate of women’s rights , 18 year old Kehkashan Basu is a trail blazer who has been challenging the status quo and breaking social strictures and taboos which impede the progress and rights of future generations. Winner of the International Children’s Peace Prize, Kehkashan embarked on her environmental crusade at the tender age of 8. Kehkashan is a tireless civil society advocate for the Sustainable Development Goals and holds leadership positions in several organizations. Kehkashan is the Founder President of award winning global social innovation enterprise, GREEN HOPE FOUNDATION, through which she empowers children and youth, especially those who were marginalized and turns them into change-makers who address sustainability issues at a local level. Kehkashan has traveled globally to spread her message of peace, equality and justice and spoken at over 75 United Nations and other international forums travelling to over 20 nations. Her speeches have influenced policy making and motivated thousands of youth and adults alike. Kehkashan is a poet, musician and author and her maiden book “Tree of Hope” was launched at the 2015 United Nations Children’s Summit in New York.

About Green Hope Foundation

We are a youth led global social innovation enterprise working on Education for Sustainable Development, Children’s Rights, Peace and Environmental Protection by empowering young people and building effective partnerships with all stakeholders of civil society , policy makers and institutions. We engage and educate youth & adults alike, through our interactive workshops and conferences involving educational institutions, communities & corporates and complement these with ground level action campaigns which target the implementation of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. Our actions are guided by the United Nations mandate of “Leave No One Behind” and our engagement programs are specially directed towards the empowerment of the world’s most marginalised sections such as refugees, orphans , the destitute and the homeless.The issues that we focus on are Climate Change, Social Upliftment, Land Degradation,Sustainable Consumption and Production, Peace ,Gender Equality, Biodiversity Conservation, Clean Energy, Future Justice and their overall impact on children’s rights.

Know Your Goals

Workshop Summary

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were formulated with specific targets in mind and to address key issues affecting our planet today. Each goal has its own importance but progress must be made in all 17 of them to ensure the overall objective . I believe that once children start taking environmental actions the next step for them is to get formally introduced to the SDGs and learn how their work can impact its implementation , locally as well as regionally . That is the objective of this workshop – we would need 17 groups , one for each goal . It would be a 2 hour workshop , with the first 20 minutes on a presentation explaining the goals . The next 40 minutes will be for the groups to brainstorm on actions or solutions to these goals – answering three questions how , whom , when . The last hour would be for each group to come up and explain these goals – using symbolism , either through drawings , a skit , a rap – its left to their creativity .

Indigenous Related Topics

It is very relevant to indigenous communities since most of them have been affected by a loss of habitat due to climate change and unsustainable practices. My workshop seeks to empower children , including indigenous children, in conserving their local environment.

Neville Hyman

Nevhouse

Schedule :

Saturday, May 4th
  • 12:00 – 12:30

Biography

Nev Hyman, is the founder of Firewire Surfboards and now founder of Nevhouse. NevHouse takes the waste that we throw away and turns it into rapidly deployable shelter. Cyclone-proof Nevhouse homes, school classrooms, medical clinics and other structures are made from recycled materials. These places of sanctuary can be built in just five days and are functional either on or off the power grid. Winner of multiple Good Design Awards including Architecture and Sustainability – NevHouse covers solutions for indigenous Australia at the community of Jilkminggan in the Northern Territory, and has build a village for survivors of the 2015 Tropical Cyclone Pam, that swept her Category 5 force in Tanna, Vanuatu. Winner of the Pitch@Palace Entrepreneurs Award, 2017, this is a flat packed, inexpensive home can be erected and dismantled in two days. It is resistant to bacteria, requires low maintenance, it’s earthquake, wind and fire resistant and lasts generations whilst diverting waste from landfill, off the streets and out of the rivers, turning it into houses for the poor. It also brings attention to the millions of homeless globally.

About Nevhouse

The Mission for Indonesia is to test response at a local Bali event. In May 13-25 Nev will be in Bali to erect a Nevhouse at the ‘Corona Karamas Pro’ along side supporting athletes such as Kelly Slater and Steph Gilmore. It would be a great honour for Nev to speak at your event during May, his first official visit to the island.

Sustainable Housing Solutions for Indigenous People

Talk Summary

A non sales-related presentation to highlight a workable sustainable housing solution while connecting, inspiring, and empowering the Green School community, as well as Indonesians from all walks of life.

Indigenous Related Topics

NevHouse’s goal is to reduce homelessness for indigenous people worldwide with adequate shelter where locals are consulted on their needs with culturally sensitive designs in collaboration with Hassel architect Ken McBride, who has designed a series of cyclone resistant shelters in Vanuatu.

Rodney Westerlaken

Westerlaken Foundation

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 10:00 – 10:30

Biography

Rodney Westerlaken is a researcher, PhD candidate on Balinese culture and an active marine environmentalist. From 2007 until last year he ran foundation soul surf project Bali with several environmental programs involving children.

About Westerlaken Foundation

Since December 2018 soul surf project Bali became Westerlaken Foundation, focussing on human rights, children rights, local Indonesian culture, emergency relief, and the marine environment, preferably in combination of each other. Rodney also works for the Ethnological Museum in Leiden, The Netherlands an Stenden University in The Netherlands and has lived on Bali for the past 13 years.

How to help coastal communities after environmental disasters

Talk Summary

After the devastating earthquakes in Lombok the results for the local communities were huge. Though how to help? Rodney Westerlaken has been actively helping in Selengen. Rodney has seen many examples of foreign help without keeping local spirit, connection to the ocean, respect and indigenous wisdom in mind, which results in misused funds, as the use of the given facilities is not optimal. The presentation will focus on how communities can be helped with keeping local customs and needs in mind.

Felipe Villela

reNature

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 12:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 10:30
  • 12:00 – 12:30

Biography

Felipe Villela is a 26-year old nature-passionate Brazilian currently living in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where he co-founded reNature, a Foundation with the goal of restoring 1 million ha of degraded landscape worldwide through regenerative agroforestry by 2030. He sees himself as a leader within the agricultural sustainability movement, by connecting people and including them in multiple projects. His positive spirit drives him to reach his own goals and to persuade others to believe in themselves, their capability to facilitate change and be a part of a worldwide movement. Together with local farmers, communities, indigenous people, government authorities, companies & organisations, reNature exchanges knowledge to design and implement an economically viable model farm. Felipe’s credo is: only action leads to change. Felipe has done all this due to his passion for ancient traditional knowledge on how to farm from the forest. 5 years ago he went on a journey to the Amazon Rainforest in Brazil to get to know indigenous communities living in harmony with nature, and he was extremely inspired by their impressive nature inclusiveness management of the forest resources to make their own clothes, food, and pieces of equipment. After that Felipe has seen how much land is being deforested in the Amazon and made a compromise with himself to change that terrible scenario. Felipe is now implementing Agroforestry farming systems with indigenous and local communities of the Amazon.

About reNature

Regenerate 1 million ha of land worldwide though Agroforestry by 2030.

Agroforestry, the ancient traditional knowledge-based agriculture that will feed our future

Talk Summary

My presentation will be about the co-relation between Agroforestry & the ancient traditional knowledge of indigenous people farming in the Amazon for centuries has. I will be explaining how these communities would grow their food by always preserving the forest ecosystems and what happened in history that changed that. After that I will show what we, within reNature, are doing to recover that knowledge and empower these indigenous people to scale up these farming systems so that we can secure their land and still be able to generate decent income for them to live from. Indigenous people are in threat in the Amazon. Agroforestry can be a potential solution to reconcile both indigenous people as well as businesses & industry needs. However, we need to create a dialogue to collaborate effectively and make a strategical starting point to make it happen. These local communities and indigenous people have the knowledge on how to manage the forest resources, reNature has the Agroforestry team as well as the connection to the most sustainable brands worldwide. That’s enough to make a decent proposal for harmonising relationships in difficult times in Brazil. The goal of my presentation is to inspire people (children, young and old people) to see how Agroforestry can be a very effective way to create cooperation between two completely different groups of people beliefs.

Indigenous Related Topics

The Amazon indigenous people are in threat of their land. Because the government believes that this is the only way of “saving” the economical situation of the country. Using that land to grow soybean, cattle and logging. However, we at reNature are now working on a masterplan to solve that issue.

Modesta Wisa

(Dayak – Indonesia)

SAKOLAH ADAT

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 9.30 – 10.30
  • 12:00 – 12:30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Modesta Wisa, a young Dayak from Manjalin, West Borneo, is the Founder of Sekolah Adat Samabue. After completing her Diploma in Environmental Health Science, instead of pursuing a career in the city, she chose to return to her village so she could work with young people, women, and traditional communities to preserve nature, culture, and the traditions of their ancestors. Supported by Green School and Mother Jungle.

About Sakolah Adat

Create a forum to connect traditional leaders and young people to continue traditional knowledge that has become the way of life of indigenous peoples. Creating independent, creative and intelligent indigenous children in the modern era while still carrying and maintaining their identity as indigenous people. Make young people proud of customs and culture.

Talk Summary

Coming Soon

Kishore Sivakumar

Center for Research and Interdisciplinary

Schedule :

Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 12:30

About Center for Research and Interdisciplinary

We are a group of international students at the Center for Research and Interdisciplinary at Paris. We have been involved in developing a scalable educational frameworks to promote research based learning and gender equality across borders. Since we strongly believe that only countries have borders but not humans values, We strive to bring about a change in the society through our approach to attain the 2030 UN SD Goals.

The mission of the organization is to promote interdsiciplinary research approaches to solve global probelms with sustainable solutions.

SARAS( Sustainable Approaches to Reinvent Advancing Societies)

Workshop Summary

We have developed a evolving framework targeted to improve education and gender inequalities around the world especially in developing countries where it is much needed. Following cutting edge approaches are fused to achieve the above mentioned goal.

1. Learning by doing to encourage translate knowledge into practical applications.

2. Learning through research to nurture autonomy and curiosity.

3. Peer to peer cooperative learning to scale and break the borders and limitation in learning.

4. Games and game based activity towards gender bias and foster inclusivity.

5. Citizen science to cultivate community participation in the advancement of science.

These structured approaches would be engagingly employed to enable the participants to target two important goals which are quality education and gender equality in their local community. The framework is developed to solve local problems by gaining the in depth understanding of the existing problem through systematic research and propose probable solutions to experiment with respect to the previously mentioned goals. Finally, members will be connected with global community of change makers to share and grow.

Indigenous Related Topics

The workshop is entirely designed to understand and to address the local problems by approaching the issues with at most sensitivity and respect.

Iris Fagniez

Bakerycycling

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 10:00 – 10:30

Biography

Iris Fagniez is a grade 11 student who recently started her own social enterprise named Bakerycycling. She originally comes from France but spent most her life in Singapore, moving to Bali in the year 2018. Having a strong passion for the environment and a true desire to help the world, Iris is constantly searching for opportunities to engage with youth on solutions regarding global issues. Bakerycyling has already opened her many windows to the discussion of pressing issues such as poor food waste management, lack of access/education to healthy food. She recently became a delegate of the Ariel Youth Foundation and was given the chance to present her concept at the UN ECOSOC forum. Iris hopes to continue meeting/collaborating with motivated youth in the hope to create a movement on responsible production and consumption.

About Bakerycycling

Vision: To create a movement on responsible consumption and production through 100 youth-led initiatives. Mission: Bakerycycling was launched in December 2018 with the aim which to reduce food waste through the upcycling of leftover bread from bakeries into granola. The granola is then sold/bartered for local organic rice produced on a sustainable farm in Ubud (Bali Organic Corner). The quality rice is then distributed to local orphanages accompanied with workshops on healthy eating to both the cooks and the children.

Bakerycyling

Talk Summary

This presentation about bakerycyling is merely to exemplify how easy it is to create a pilot project based on an issue you feel passionate about. In this case, we tackle the problem of food waste and promote responsible consumption and production through a nexus approach. With this simple and duplicable model, I hope to inspire other youth to put their creativity to work and develop concepts that are both self sustaining and beneficial at a social, environmental and economic level.

Indigenous Related Topics

Bakercycling emphasises the importance of creating concepts that involve/rely on the local community. We have therefore partnered with local organic farmers, a local orphanage and most importantly local bakeries. Each stakeholder is key to the process and allows this concept to run smoothly.

Ronaldiaz Hartantyo

Mycotech

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 10:45 – 11:15
Saturday, May 4th
  • 11:30 – 12:00

Biography

I’m an architect who grow mushroom

About Mycotech

We grow material from mushroom.

From Fungi to the Fashion

Talk Summary

We grow leather-like material from mushroom, we call them MYLEA from Mycelium Leather. It’s not leather but it’s better.

Indigenous Related Topics

We use local agricultural waste as the mushroom media. Our dream is to decentralized the production, so we can collaborate with local farmers, using their own local agricultural waste, to grow material locally, and to build their local community.

Palani Bearghost

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 12:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 9:30 – 10:30
Saturday, May 4th
  • 12:00 – 12:30
  • 13:40 – 15:00

Biography

Palani Bearghost’s Tribal Affiliation is Three Affiliated Tribes Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara. Northern Cheyenne, Dine, and Oglala Sioux. Palani has an education in Business Management; Marketing Emphasis. Palani also has a background in Botany, Science, and Fashion. Palani is the CEO and Founder of NEO Designs. An androgynous clothing line that is inspired from her Indigenous Roots that are authentic and collectively working with other Artists to keep our stories and designs alive through wearable art and expression through each piece. Art truly saves lives. Palani is also an Activist for humanity and for our responsibility to the Earth. Honoring those that came before us and those that come after and how we leave an imprint for the next seventh generation. With community and connection there is no liberation. Mitakuye Oyasin We Are All Connected.

Birth of a Regeneration & Healing of Nation

Talk Summary

Connection: To the lands, the culture, to the earth, the movement, the spirits in each and every living thing, our imprints we leave on earth, building community nationally & internationally, birthing of a regeneration and healing of a nation to find solutions to co exist for generations to come. Protect: In our beliefs, the people, the lands, the oceans and seas, the rain forests, Earth that is a life source not a resource, animals that we share this earth with, exist, resist, & rise collectively. Respect: All walks of life regardless of gender, race, religion, ethnicity, honoring those that come before us and those that come after us, reciprocity with each other and the Earth and all the living that are sacred.

Indigenous Related Topics

Every aspect pertains to and is related to Indigenous Community in theory and philosphically and to the world as a whole of how important unity and community is.

 

Cleary Vaughan-Lee

Global Oneness Project

Schedule :

Friday, May 3rd
  • 13:45 – 16:00
Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 12:00

Biography

Cleary is the Executive Director of the Global Oneness Project. She asks local to global questions about culture and the environment and believes stories are a transformative tool for learning.

About Global Oneness Project

The Global Oneness Project brings the world’s cultures alive in the classroom using stories as a pedagogical tool for growing minds. Committed to the exploration of cultural, environmental, and social issues, they offer a rich library of multimedia stories comprised of award-winning films, photo essays, and articles. Companion curriculum and discussion guides are also available, all for free.

They aim to connect, through stories, the local human experience to global meta-level issues, such as climate change, water scarcity, food insecurity, poverty, endangered cultures, migration, and sustainability. Through featuring individuals and communities impacted by these issues, the stories and lessons provide opportunities to examine universal themes which include the following: identity, diversity, hope, resilience, imagination, adversity, empathy, love, and responsibility, and our common humanity.

Environmental and Cultural Stories: Voice Your Perspective

Workshop Summary

This workshop will explore the power of cultural and environmental multimedia to engage participants with environmental and indigenous rights issues. Explore engaging questions and themes and voice your perspective and solutions to global issues.

Indigenous Related Topics

This workshop will explore stories from indigenous communities witnessing language loss, climate change, and food security, to name a few. Participants will explore how indigenous individuals are preserving parts of their culture, what challenges they face, and potential solutions.

Randi Miranda

Dayak – Indonesia

Schedule :

Saturday, May 4th
  • 9:30 – 10:30
  • 11:30 – 12:00
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Randi is the founder and CEO of Handep Haruei, a social enterprise startup in the field of forestry and agriculture in Central Kalimantan. Prior to this, he has long been involved in green movements across Kalimantan and had served as Environmental Ambassador for the Kalimantan region for two consecutive years, in 2010 and 2011. He has extensive experience working as a project management and communication specialist within the fields of forest conservation, and sustainable development. Some NGOs he has worked with include the Heart of Borneo Project (HoBP), International Labour Organization (ILO), and The Forest Trust.

He recently obtained his Master’s degree in Environment specializing in development at the University of Melbourne, Australia in 2018. He is also a social scientist whose research focuses on forest governance and development practices associated with indigenous people and gender equality.

Creating a locally-sensitive and sustainable economic development

Talk Summary

My talk will cover the issues we are facing in Central Kalimantan related to the rampant deforestation and corporate domination on our lands and what our social enterprise does to help address these issues. With the local community, we strive to re-define the current development narrative by going just beyond mere monetary terms but also factoring in healthy forests, clean air and water, rich biodiversity, preserved culture and tradition. Our work is central to creating added value to local resources sustainably to improve the quality of life of our local people and environment. This can only be done by listening to and understanding the needs and interests of the local people through bottom-up and equal partnership approach.

Indigenous Related Topics

My talks covers the issues of violation of rights of indigenous people especially related to land grabbing and self-determination to development goals. I especially highlight that indigenous communities have become mere objects or instruments in development practices rather than the subjects.

Hugo Metz

IF NOT US THEN WHO

Schedule :

Thursday, May 2nd
  • 9:00 – 12:00
Friday, May 3rd
  • 11:30 – 12:30
  • 13:45 – 16:00

Biography

Hugo is a French freelance director and producer whose work has involved traveling, filming, directing and editing a variety of shortdocs, featuredocs and documentary series. He collaborates with European major TV broadcasters such as : TF1, FR2 and ARTE and has started working with newcomers from the digital world, like multiple channel networks, digital storytellers and pure player medias.. Specialized in telling stories that highlight the natural though fragile relationship between men and nature he feels – on both personal and professional levels – that now is a critical time to help mitigating climate change and changing the world dominant model of development. Hugo has been involved with the #ifnotusthenwho campaign since 2014. He became member of the board in 2017 and was appointed Chief Financial Officer of the organisation the very same year.

About IF NOT US THEN WHO

If Not Us Then Who is a US registered charity, 501(c)(3) that supports a global awareness campaign highlighting the role indigenous and local communities play in protecting our planet. We work in partnership with communities to make films, take photographs, curate content, commission local artists and host events. Our work aims to build lasting networks, target unjust policies, and advocate for greater rights for indigenous and local peoples to bring about positive social change. All the films made for the If Not Us Then Who project are participatory – we work with indigenous peoples to tell the stories they want to tell. From Indonesia to Peru, we have been working with indigenous networks to interpret their experience and, as a result, the material you see on this website broadly reflects the work of our core partners – AMAN, AMPB, APIB, REPALEF and COICA. Our goal is ultimately to give the material back to communities so they can use them to campaign and affect change at a local level. We support this work by bringing our material to the attention of international audiences through events and by creating specific social media content to raise awareness. This is vital in an age when over consumption of commodities directly affects local communities. Our material is being used by many international non-governmental Organisations (Global Witness, Rainforest Foundation, ISA, Rainforest Action Network) to inform policy makers in large corporations and in governments of the needs of communities. The material is a doorway into understanding complex issues such as climate change or the commodities trade, at a community level. When the timing is right our material has also been used by journalists, featuring in Le Monde, El Pais, The New York Times, The Guardian, Mongabay, BBC online and in many other publications. We hope this material is used to educate and inform, to change minds and to appeal to the heart. We are building up our series of training sessions for our indigenous partners, empowering their own storytelling. As the project has evolved, we are now looking beyond our own content to build a visual library of indigenous storytelling and high quality short films relevant to the growing global indigenous movement.

We are not fighting for nature. We are nature fighting back.

Talk Summary

Over the last five years the team behind the ‘If not us then who?’ project have been trying to build understanding, trust and solidarity. We are trying to understand what it means to save forests for the peoples that live in them. Our journey began by talking to indigenous leaders about their stories and their heroes from their communities. These powerful and emotional stories have not often been revealed and so by revealing them we empower them and by retelling them they are given meaning. With the project and our indigenous partners we are also trying to build trust. Trust within the indigenous movement, that across the world there is a shared set of beliefs. Trust within the charity sector of the importance of local solutions. Trust within the eyes of the public of the co-existence of forests and people. Now, here in Bali, trust in our future generations to protect the world’s forests. With this trust we can bring people together to build the solidarity we need to heal our planet.

More to be announced.